Luigi’s Mansion Review – Old Haunts

Luigi’s Mansion Review – Old Haunts. Luigi’s Mansion was a curious launch title for the GameCube back in 2001, and it’s even more curious as an end-of-life title for the 3DS. It’s got the feel of an eccentric mid-generation release, a July stopgap to keep you going while you wait for the next major title. But Nintendo’s faith in Luigi’s Mansion, which has taken on a cult status over the years and has a second sequel due to release on Switch next year, isn’t misplaced–the game still has a lot of charm.

Luigi’s Mansion sees Mario’s put-upon younger brother exploring a mansion after receiving a letter telling him that he won it in a contest. He arrives to find that not only is the mansion haunted and full of ghosts, but that Mario received a similar letter and has not been seen since he entered. When it released, the game represented a major shift away from the usual Mario format–there’s no jump button here. Instead, Luigi has a flashlight and a ghost-sucking vacuum (the Poltergust 3000), which he needs to use to rid the mansion of ghosts and save a captured Mario in the process. You move through the mansion methodically, unlocking new rooms by vacuuming up the ghosts in the ones you’ve already opened.

Luigi's Mansion Review

The ghosts are divided between your standard ghoulies, ‘portrait’ ghosts (mini-bosses and bosses, essentially, which have escaped out of paintings), and Nintendo’s familiar Boos. Standard ghosts come in a few different varieties–some will grab you, others will punch, throw bombs, or hurl banana peels for you to slip on–and can be vacuumed up once you shine your flashlight at the heart visible in their ethereal chests. When you start up your vacuum, Luigi will be dragged around the room as they try to escape, and you lower their hit-points by pulling the stick away from them, as though Luigi was pulling back, while keeping the vacuum trained on them. It’s a fun system, especially when you manage to nab multiple ghosts at once and have to put in the effort to reel them all in.

Luigi’s ‘Strobulb’ flashlight from Luigi’s Mansion 2 has also been added. The Strobulb, which can be charged for an extra big flash of light, is useful in a few scenarios–I found that it was helpful for nabbing multiple invisible enemies at once–but the game was designed with a standard flashlight in mind, and I mostly stuck with it.

Portrait ghosts are the main meat of the game and capturing them generally involves solving a small puzzle or figuring out the pattern of their movements. None of them are too complicated–you can examine each portrait ghost for a clue, and simply interacting with the objects in the room will usually trigger the ghost’s ‘stun’ state so that you can begin to vacuum them. These are fun encounters, even if their patterns are usually easy to predict. Hunting the 50 Boos that scatter around the mansion at a certain point in the story is enjoyable for the first 40-or-so–a blinking light on the screen lets you know when you’re close to one, and during a chase they can slip through walls and into other rooms–but the novelty of these pursuits wears out towards the end of the game.

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